The Monitor and the Merrimac

The Monitor and the Merrimac
Both sides of the story

By

4
(1 Review)
The Monitor and the Merrimac by H. Ashton Ramsay, John Lorimer Worden, Samuel Dana Greene, Eugene Winslow Watson

Published:

1912

Downloads:

1,177

Share This

The Monitor and the Merrimac
Both sides of the story

By

4
(1 Review)
This is the first-hand story of what was done and seen and felt on each side in the battle of the Monitor and the Merrimac. The actual experiences on both vessels are pictured, in one case by the commander of the Monitor, then a lieutenant, and the next in rank, Lieutenant Greene, and in the other by Chief-Engineer Ramsay of the Merrimac. Clearly such a record of personal experiences has a place by itself in the literature of the subject.

Book Excerpt

crack, was watching the effect of our shot, something happened to me--my part in the fight was ended. Lieutenant Greene, who fought the Merrimac until she had no longer stomach for fighting, will tell you the rest of the story."

Can it be possible that this beardless boy fought one of the historic battles of the world? This was the thought of every one, as the modest, diffident young Greene was half pushed forward into the circle.

"I cannot add much to the Captain's story," he began. "He had cut out the work for us, and we had only to follow his pattern. I kept the Monitor either moving around the circle or around the enemy, and endeavored to place our shots as near her amidships as possible, where Captain Worden believed he had already broken through her armor. We knew that she could not sink us, and I thought I would keep right on pounding her as long as she would stand it. There is really nothing new to be added to Captain Worden's account. We could strike her wherever we c

Readers reviews

5
4
3
2
1
4.0
Average from 1 Review
4
Write Review
Profile picture for user stevojm
russellmz
4
Gripping account of the first fight between ironclads. The Monitor's captain provides a firsthand account of some risky actions he did during the course of the fight. A Confederate on the Virginia/Merrimac tells of his account in the first half.

Not a very long read.