Dai Alanye

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Dai Alanye

Dai Alanye’s book reviews

Naively-written. Clues fall effortlessly, with hardly a single red herring or blind alley, into the lap of a boring protagonist. The romance is sketchily handled, as seems the case with all of Fletcher's efforts. Too bad, for he's skilled at developing plots.
10/20/2013
Of the several Fletcher books I've so far read, this one, reminiscent of Kidnapped, is the most interesting. A weak denouement, though,as is all too typical of him.
10/20/2013
Typical old-fashioned detective novel but with some thriller aspects. Not a bad read but preposterous in certain aspects.

First, we have experienced men--including attorney Lester, the "Watson" of the series--going into hysterics and collapsing like little girls when presented with something unexpected. Second, the "Holmes" of the series--super detective Godfrey--lets himself be drawn away from the scene at a critical time, regardless that he knew that it was going to be the key happening.

But if the reader willingly suspends a degree of skepticism...
09/23/2013
Yes, there's no doubt that Muller is different, as the authors take great pains to inform us. What makes these worth reading, though, is the difference in old Austrian society from our own, more than Muller's detecting. While ingenious, the clues too often fall into Muller's hands, and his initial hypothesies are too often right on the money.
09/21/2013
Unusual and well-written, with a solid plot, and a good villain among other realistic characters. On the negative side, could use better description of the physical scene, and the denouement is a bit contrived.
09/21/2013
I'm no fan of Oppenheim. He uses language well but often plots poorly, has limited characters, and his premises are questionable. Illustrious Prince is the most preposterous story of his that I've yet read.
09/13/2013
Over the past several months I've read numerous mysteries written from post US Civil War to the great Depression. Though some have been interesting, the majority have been unlikely, dependent upon coincidence or weakly written. Hand in the Dark is the best I've yet read.

It's lengthy but complex, covering a gruesome and puzzling murder that occurs in an English country home, and reviewing the individual reasonings of three competing detectives.

I'll be looking for more by Arthur Rees.
09/13/2013
Considerable mystery but little actual detecting as we expect it. More of a thriller, in fact. Well written and fast-moving.
09/06/2013
Puzzled by a complex murder--the victim having been electrocuted, poisoned, head-bashed and stabbed? And what of all the clocks being stopped at different times, eh? Fortunately the next murder is simpler, no electricity being involved.

Not to worry, for Colonel R E Lee Ashley, America's answer to Inspector Clouseau, is on the job, sneaking and eavesdropping everywhere in the hopes that the murderer will inadvertently confess. Poor fish!
09/06/2013
Intriguing, although long-winded, and only the first of two volumes. Somewhat distasteful, assuming the depiction of Parisian life to be accurate, for it was impossible to trust anyone at the particular era.
09/03/2013
Stephen C. Perkins - Thrilling, Entertaining and Thought Provoking Sci-Fi/Fantasy
FEATURED AUTHOR - In less than two years as an independent author, Massachusetts native Stephen Perkins’ thrilling, entertaining and thought provoking novels Sorcerers’ Dynasty, Raging Falcon, American Siren, and Escape to Death have gained a loyal and rabid audience. As our Author of the Day, Perkins tells us all about his book, Sky Parlor. Please give us a short introduction to what Sky Parlor is about. Sky Parlor, my latest release – available at Amazon in both ebook and print formats, which are available… Read more