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ilikerobots’s book reviews

Genuinely funny. Although some situations are dated, human behavior (or misbehavior) is clearly constant.
09/02/2012
This novel is presumed to be autobiographical and is not the light-hearted whimsy of Three Men in a Boat, although there is humor to be found. Jerome is at his best when writing humor. In this book, Jerome reveals (via Kelver) his sometimes reluctant reconciliation with his role as a humorist.

I imagine only fans of Jerome will be likely to give this book a read. It is more powerful and touching for being so clearly heartfelt, but may not be of much interest to those not interested in Jerome.
01/17/2011
Like the Titanic, the Star Lord was considered by many to be indestructible. Its fate is predictable. The story is competently written, but isn't particularly gripping.
01/17/2011
In this story, men take their turn at captivity on an alien planet after having raised an alien in captivity on Earth. It starts promising but mostly falters.
01/17/2011
This is a short newsletter with some tips and recipes for using soybeans in everyday cooking. It was published by Univ of Illinois in 1914.

The document proposes soybeans as a great substitute protein during a time of rationing of meat (I didn't know meat was rationed in the US during WWI).

The USA grows a LOT of soybeans (rivaling corn in both annual acreage and sales). Like corn, the majority of harvested soybean is not used for human consumption. Unlike corn, soybeans are rarely used nowadays as a cooking ingredient in the US. This publication was perhaps an attempt to boost the Illinois economy by promoting a market for soybeans.

Forget the recipes in here. I recommend you show your appreciation for the noble soybean with a tasty snack of edamame. Find a recipe online or visit a Japanese restaurant!
12/18/2010
The setting is more static and a bit more introspective than Three Men in a Boat, but I found it just as enjoyable.
12/06/2010
I imagine this would have been much more exciting and interesting in its own time, when the audience hadn't already been inundated by submarine movies. The book's anecdotes are now probably familiar archetypical scenes to the average reader.

However, it is noteworthy since it was written by an actual U-202 captain. Unfortunately, it lacks specifics so it doesn't illuminate any historical events (that I know of). Indeed, the author mentions near the beginning that some of the events didn't happen to him personally, but to other captains in his circle of acquaintance.

But it's a quick read and gives some insight into the personality, motives, and demeanor of a WWI U-boat captain.
10/02/2010
As the blurb says, the setting is genuinely unique. Combined with the compelling protagonist, the story is clever, well-crafted, and fast-paced. I'm going to seek out more from this author.
09/19/2010
Its accessibility might disguise the astounding level of insight and intelligence within the pages. It may seem like an adventure with a relatively shallow, cursory commentary on social conditions, but a bit of contemplation will reveal some staggering predictions (and warnings!) from Wells.

Take from this story whatever you like (it is simply fun on the surface!). However, if you find yourself dismissing its message as a simple warning against the stratification of society, then I recommend you think a little harder about what it is truly trying to tell you. Perhaps what you thought were metaphors weren't quite as abstract as you thought; and those aspects you dismissed as plot mechanics mean a bit more.
04/26/2010
Andrew Updegrove - A Cybersecurity Expert With a Knack for Running Into Situations
FEATURED AUTHOR - Andrew Updegrove's Tales of Adversego thriller series is an outgrowth of several inspirations. The technical subject matter derives from the author's more than thirty years of experience representing technology start up clients. Along the way, Updegrove has become intimately familiar with the types of folks that populate the technology ecosystem: entrepreneurs and career engineering employees, angel investors and venture capitalists, policy makers and regulators, idealists and lobbyists. That’s… Read more