kveto from prague

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kveto from prague

kveto from prague’s book reviews

I'm not sure what to make of this book. It is an entertaining read as it focuses on an American millionaire, King Kerry, who arrives in London and shakes up the business world with his purchases. Along the way he gets involved with a receptionist in a random way and works his way into a mystery.
I wasn't completely sold on Kerry as a protagonist. He uses tactics like relying on his vast wealth to buy up property his competitors can't afford and undercutting their prices with the intention of driving them out of business. Generally practices that would be frowned on today, but I guess we should consider him innovative. He struck me as a bully with more money using that as leverage to win his real life game of monopoly.
But yeah, there is a twist ending which is surprising. A decent read although Im not tempted to reread it to try to see it coming.
01/20/2021
Quite an exciting adventure set in Afganistan of the early 20th century. Has adventure, fighting, and treachery enough for any pulp fan.
10/24/2020
the second story of Irish crusader, Cormac Fitzgeoffery, is the least memorable. It's basically a bunch of different nationalities in the Levant trying to backstab each other. Not much story here.

Unfortunately, REH didn't complete "Slave Princess" the final Cormac story, which would have been the best Comac story for certain. (enough exists to set up the plot well)
07/18/2020
Incredibly short tale about an attempted fictional coup in Costa Rica. Reads like a news report.
07/17/2020
An exceptional bit of pulp. Conan and Valeria are thrown into a claustrophobic, underground of Mezo-American factions fighting a bloody war of attrition. Howard was always the best at atmosphere. Some elements might feel familiar as this style of setting (faction wars with an outsider arriving) has been copied almost as often as "The Most Dangerous game"
07/17/2020
A really fantastic book, less so for the mystery/adventure, moreso for the fascinating snapshot of the underground of NY in 1916. It takes you on a whirlwind tour of the life of gangsters, district attorneys, sufferegettes, the city morgue and black and tan joints.
The author was apparently a reporter and his eye for detail shines through. I love books like this, written during the actual time period, rather than an author imagining they were there. If this were written by a contemporay author, the author would feel the need to encourage the heroines the sufferegette movement, or comment on the wonderful mixing of whites and blacks at a black and tan joint, in order to be "on the right side of history", rather than just reporting the conditions without judgement, just using them to add colour to the atmosphere.
The enthusiasm for the lastest technological advances in listening devices such as a "detectograph"would also be missed.
A true gem that deserves to be celebrated and not passed into obscurity. Much better than any modern writer could do with the time period.
11/20/2019
Set in the year 1900, this is a reasonable mystery about the murder of a south african millionarie in london.
11/17/2019
Wilford's stuff is good, particularly if you like scoundrals as main characters. Much more interesting than the usual straightforward protagonists.
11/14/2019
Mark Whiteway - Epic Sci-Fi Adventure Featuring an Ancient Destructive Technology
FEATURED AUTHOR - Writing SciFi has been a long-held ambition for Mark Whiteway. As a kid, he read everything - H.G. Wells, Jules Verne, Robert Heinlein, etc., etc. At twelve years old, he wrote a novella. Following that, life intervened, and it was only in April '09 that Mark determined that he wanted to get back to writing. He had several ideas running around in his head for some time, of which the Lodestone concept was probably the strongest. As our Author of the Day, he tells us more about the trilogy.