Reviews by Marc

Underground

by Suelette Dreyfus

Gripping non-fiction book about several hackers, their motives, their methods, and their private lives. If you enjoyed "The Cuckoo's Egg" by Cliff Stoll, or if you like computer books in general, you'll probably like this one.

Reviewed on 2008.05.30

In the Sargasso Sea

by Thomas A. Janvier

Could hardly put it down. Surprisingly adventurous and readable for a book from 1898. I felt as if I were in the main character's shoes.

I highly recommend this book if you are up for some nautical adventure! Also if you own a cat, as I do, I think you'll like it too. :-)

Reviewed on 2008.05.15

The Return of Blue Pete

by Luke Allan

"The story lives up to its promise"

You can find a short review of this title from a 1922 New York Times, using this link:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9B05E6DE1F3CEE3ABC4953DFB6678389639EDE

This links to a full-article PDF; the review is the last paragraph of the PDF article. It was awesome to come up with that from a Google search! :)

Looking forward to reading this one!

Reviewed on 2008.05.01

The King James Bible

by Various Authors

I've been reading the writings of Josephus (Jewish historian from the first century A.D.) and these writings piqued my interest in the Bible once again.

Readers are advised not to think too literally when it comes to dragons and such (this is not a western book - it is an eastern book full of eastern symbolism). In fact I recommend you read along with a commentary as you study. And a study it is.

For example, Ecclesiastes is a fantastic complement to many of the philosophies manifest in modern Buddhist texts. Take this verse:

"Therefore remove sorrow from thy heart, and put away evil from thy flesh: for childhood and youth are vanity."

The equation of evil with vanity is really a key to moving from childhood to adulthood. In other words, we stop acting like children (live less selfishly, act less out of jealousy, etc.) so that we can live a more fulfilling life. This is one small key to feeling like we really *are* progressing in life.

What the coming of Jesus Christ adds to this is the promise of overcoming physical death ("oh death, where is thy sting?") through his resurrection, and of overcoming spiritual death (mistakes, misdeeds) through his work of atonement. We learn that man is not perfect, nor need he be to achieve happiness in his life.

While the simpler, more "self help"-like verses of the Bible are easy to swallow in small chunks and go down quite easy, a full study of the book is rewarded with a more general consciousness of the purpose of our life and the promise of an eventual reconciliation that takes into account our troubles, sorrows, mistakes, achievements and aspirations.

"To this end was I born" -Jesus Christ

Reviewed on 2008.04.25

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