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The Bible Book by Book

A Manual for the Outline Study of the Bible by Books

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Published: 1916
Language: English
Wordcount: 44,865 / 156 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 68.7
LoC Categories: BL, BS
Downloads: 13,218
Added to site: 2005.07.14 10962

In sending forth this second edition of The Bible Book by Book it has seemed wise to make some changes in it. The descriptive matter has been put in paragraph instead of tabular form; the analyses have been made shorter and less complex; the lessons based on the Old Testament books have been omitted or incorporated in the topics of study which have been increased, It is believed that the make-up of the book is better and more attractive.

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cordingly: (1) The Strong one used 225 times in the Old Testament; (2) The Strong one as an object of worship; (3) The Strong one who is faithful and, therefore, to be trusted and obeyed. This last is a plural term and is used 2300 times in the Old Testament. It is the name used when God said. "Let us make man" and "God created man in his own image," etc., Gen. 1:26-27. It was by this name that God the Trinity covenanted for the good of man before man was created.

2. LORD. Small capitals in the old version and translated Jehovah in the in the revised translation. It means: (1) The self-existing one who reveals himself; (2) God as Redeemer. It was under this name that he sought man after the fall and clothed him with skins. Gen. 3:9-17; (3) God who makesand keeps his covenants. It is used more than 100 times in connection with the covenants, as in Jer. 31:31-34 where he promises a new covenant.

3. Lord. Small letters except the L and always denotes God as Master in his relation to us as servants. The



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Brian Blose
Brian Blose is a software developer and army veteran who enjoys reading and writing fiction that contains flawed heroes, unreliable narrators and moral dilemmas. His book, The Participants, is no exception and had readers glued to the story until the very last page. As our author of the day, Blose chats about the Heinsenberg uncertainty principle, how TV shows from the 90s inspired this book and gives us some behind-the-scenes insights in the creation of The Participants.
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