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The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

Translated by James Ingram

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Author: Anonymous
Published: 1823
Language: English
Wordcount: 94,277 / 270 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 30.7
LoC Category: DA
Downloads: 4,714 6
Genre: History

Originally compiled on the orders of King Alfred the Great,approximately A.D. 890, and subsequently maintained and added toby generations of anonymous scribes until the middle of the 12thCentury. The original language is Anglo-Saxon (Old English), butlater entries are essentially Middle English in tone.Translation by Rev. James Ingram (London, 1823), with additionalreadings from the translation of Dr. J.A. Giles (London, 1847).

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To the first question we answer, that the "Saxon Chronicle" contains the original and authentic testimony of contemporary writers to the most important transactions of our forefathers, both by sea and land, from their first arrival in this country to the year 1154. Were we to descend to particulars, it would require a volume to discuss the great variety of subjects which it embraces. Suffice it to say, that every reader will here find many interesting facts relative to our architecture, our agriculture, our coinage, our commerce, our naval and military glory, our laws, our liberty, and our religion. In this edition, also, will be found numerous specimens of Saxon poetry, never before printed, which might form the ground-work of an introductory volume to Warton's elaborate annals of English Poetry. Philosophically considered, this ancient record is the second great phenomenon in the history of mankind. For, if we except the sacred annals of the Jews, contained in the several books of the Old T



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