Emma

Author: Jane Austen
Published: 1815
Language: English
Wordcount: 159,601 / 441 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 73.4
LoC Category: PR
Audiobook: librivox.org
Downloads: 69,954
mnybks.net#: 693
Origin: gutenberg.org
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The main character, Emma Woodhouse, is described in the opening paragraph as ''handsome, clever, and rich'' but is also rather spoiled. As a result of the recent marriage of her former governess, Emma prides herself on her ability to matchmake, and proceeds to take under her wing an illegitimate orphan, Harriet Smith, whom she hopes to marry off to the vicar, Mr Elton. So confident is she that she persuades Harriet to reject a proposal from a young farmer who is a much more suitable partner for the girl.

Show Excerpt

sly."

"Only one more, papa; only for Mr. Elton. Poor Mr. Elton! You like Mr. Elton, papa,--I must look about for a wife for him. There is nobody in Highbury who deserves him--and he has been here a whole year, and has fitted up his house so comfortably, that it would be a shame to have him single any longer--and I thought when he was joining their hands to-day, he looked so very much as if he would like to have the same kind office done for him! I think very well of Mr. Elton, and this is the only way I have of doing him a service."

"Mr. Elton is a very pretty young man, to be sure, and a very good young man, and I have a great regard for him. But if you want to shew him any attention, my dear, ask him to come and dine with us some day. That will be a much better thing. I dare say Mr. Knightley will be so kind as to meet him."

"With a great deal of pleasure, sir, at any time," said Mr. Knightley, laughing, "and I agree with you entirely, that it will be a much better thing. Invite him to

Reviews

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Average Rating of 3.7 from 9 reviews: ****
2013.06.18
arunima joshua
***..

Taken in the context of its time, the novel 'Emma' is a delightfully fun and witty examination of the societal constraints and mores of the period in which it takes place. Plot is not essential here, and there really isn't a great deal of it. It's the characters who count, and Emma is certainly the most captivating of the lot. She bears some resemblance to the major female leads of other Jane Austen novels, but rather lacks the spirited, rebelliousness of Elizabeth Benett (of 'Pride and Predjudice').

2012.11.24
sophie
*****

I read Emma and I think it is not a bad book. you may learn a lot of things from this book. Emma is not really a clever person because if she was clever she would arrange things better.

2010.10.03
bokemom
*****

I remember being forced to read Jane Austen in high school and not liking it at all. Now many years later I decide to try again, imagine my surprise at how good I find her books. Jane Austen had an incredible talent at characterization. Change the setting and the language and the characters are as true as when they were written. Austen's sly, subversive social commentary is hard to match. The fun in reading Emma doesn't come from the basic plot, but in the way Austen lampoons the social mores of her times.

2009.12.11
.....

no review

2008.07.26
Priyam
*****

Emma is the first Jane Austen work that I've read and it would be an understatement to say that I found it marvellous! It's hard not to fall in love with the characters which are crafted so beautifully- right from Emma the protagonist to Mrs. Elton! I particularly loved Mr. Knightley. The best thing about the story is the old world classic charm and the way a person's character is guaged according to his letter writing skills! It makes one wonder how beautiful life must have been in the ear when people actually had the depth and the insight to analyse other individuals unlike the modern fast paced life where sms language is the order of the day!
Reading Emma is an experience in itself and such a beautiful one!

2008.07.01
S Radha Prathi
*****

Though the language used in Emma appears to be highly flowery and outdated in contemporary times, the contents that capture the subtle nuances of human behaviour, like emotions, expectations and reactions have an universal value.

The ingrained superiority complex which is the folly of Emma, the fair-minded common sense of Mr Knightley, the pomposity of Mr Elton, the possessiveness of Mr Woodhouse, the gallantry of Frank Churchill and the naivete of Harriet capture varying shades of human behaviour in a wide spectrum of colours.

An Indian reader can immediately identify himself with the characters in the story for we are a race that believe in "arranging" marriages taking into consideration the caste, economic and social status and the family connections of the bride or groom to be. a truly commendable book of her age and date.

2008.03.04
Generosa
*....

"Emma" was my first attempt at reading Jane Austen's works. Recognizing that she wrote Classics, I ventured forth enthusiastically. Sorry to say I never "got it" with this book. To me the characters were dull, the writing was tedious, and the plot was boring and not the least bit interesting to me. After 100 pages I gave up. Even the English of her time was unfamiliar and not easy to grasp. I won't give up and shall try her other books.

2007.03.09
Lindsay Brambles
****.

It's difficult not to like Emma--the character--despite the fact that she seems to lead a rather vapid life. Of course, this is a function of the society in which she lives, and one can imagine such a charming and intelligent woman being a far more productive individual were she to exist today.

Taken in the context of its time, the novel 'Emma' is a delightfully fun and witty examination of the societal constraints and mores of the period in which it takes place. Plot is not essential here, and there really isn't a great deal of it. It's the characters who count, and Emma is certainly the most captivating of the lot. She bears some resemblance to the major female leads of other Jane Austen novels, but rather lacks the spirited, rebelliousness of Elizabeth Benett (of 'Pride and Predjudice').

'Emma', as a novel, is not as tightly written as Pride and Predjudice (which is probably Austen's best known and best loved work). There are places in 'Emma' that certainly could have done with some decent editing, sections of dialogue that are simply far too protracted and tend to weary the reader. That said, the book is still worth investing the time to read.

Lindsay Brambles (author of 'In Darkness Bound')

2005.10.16
Lainey
*****

Emma was my introduction to the world of Jane Austen and I felt most welcome. Emma is the story of Emma Woodhouse, a self-satisfied girl who has it all, and her mischiefs in matchmaking. I thought it was very silly at first that this entire book is all about who ends up with whom but Jane Austen does more than that, in fact Jane Austen is a lot more than that. There are also some characters here you'll probably relate to someone you know, talkative Ms Bates, silly Harriet Smith, pretentious Mrs Elton, prim and proper Jane Fairfax, etc.


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