Fungi: Their Nature and Uses

Published: 1875
Language: English
Wordcount: 107,478 / 349 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 38.9
LoC Category: QK
Downloads: 898
Added to site: 2009.10.06
mnybks.net#: 25468
Genre: Science
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Excerpt

>sic).

This is but another mode of stating the same thing as above referred to by M. Trécul, that certain cells, resembling yeast cells (Torula), are developed spontaneously, and that these ultimately pass through the form of mould called Penicillium to the more complex Mucor (which the writer evidently has confounded with Aspergillus, unless he alludes to the ascigerous form of Aspergillus, long known as Eurotium). From what is now known of the polymorphism of fungi, there would be little difficulty in believing that cells resembling yeast cells would develop into Penicillium, as they do in fact in what is called the "vinegar plant," and that the capsuliferous, or higher condition of this mould may be a Mucor, in which the sporules are produced in capsules. The difficulty arises earlier, in the supposed spontaneous origination of yeast cells from molecules, which result from the peculiar conditions of light, t

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