The Golden Censer

The duties of to-day, the hopes of the future

Author: John McGovern
Published: 1881
Language: English
Wordcount: 83,563 / 241 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 33.5
LoC Category: PN
Downloads: 273
Added to site: 2006.02.18
mnybks.net#: 510
Genre: Essays
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Excerpt

and with greater facility than reason; which, when we have most need of it, is seldom fairly consulted, and more rarely obeyed." Thus, you see, when a man is spoken of as a person "of good habits," it means something more than is usually conceived. It means he is under chains which he cannot break--and, in reality, that he could not be a bad man without suffering and discomfort.


SUCCESS.

Nothing succeeds so well as success.--Talleyrand.

[Illustration T] The man Talleyrand, who made the above mocking assertion, was one of the closest observers of human nature who have ever lived. And yet what he said in a spirit of uncommon hatred of his fellow-beings is really another way of saying the exact truth--that success comes only after so many trials and disappointments that the world, considering it a safe rule, admires the result, and feels that the reflected credit for a great result belongs to him upon whom it falls. Beside you toils a young man of your own age. He does not seem to care to rise. He dislikes the few duties of the present, and would be inclined to shrink from further responsibilities. It may be that he is the happier as comp

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