A Book of Natural History

Young Folks' Library Volume XIV.

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1902
Language: English
Wordcount: 104,758 / 305 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 42.6
LoC Category: PZ
Downloads: 2,159
Added to site: 2006.04.29
mnybks.net#: 13523
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Edited by David Starr Jordan

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ilar to the vegetable albumin, which is called animal albumin.

If the yolk is beaten up with water, no starch nor cellulose is obtained from it, but there will be plenty of fatty and some saccharine matter, besides substances more or less similar to albumin and gluten.

The feathers of the fowl are chiefly composed of horn; if they are stripped off and the body is boiled for a long time, the water will be found to contain a quantity of gelatin, which sets into a jelly as it cools; and the body will fall to pieces, the bones and the flesh separating from one another. The bones consist almost entirely of a substance which yields gelatin when it is boiled in water, impregnated with a large quantity of salts of lime, just as the wood of the wheat stem is impregnated with silica. The flesh, on the other hand, will contain albumin, and some other substances which are very similar to albumin, termed fibrin and syntonin.

In the living bird, all these bodies are united with a great quantity of wate

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