Scientific American Supplement, No. 303 (Oct 22, 1881)

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1881
Language: English
Wordcount: 38,365 / 121 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 60
LoC Categories: AP, Q
Downloads: 524
mnybks.net#: 351
Origin: gutenberg.org
Genre: Periodical
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Excerpt

se it is more ductile and the advantage of less weight is gained, as will be seen when it is mentioned that the Servia, if built of iron, would have weighed 620 tons more than she does of steel, and would have entailed the drawback of a corresponding increase in draught of water. As regards rig, the three vessels have each a different style. The Cunard Company have adhered to their special rig--three masts, bark rigged--believing it to be more ship shape than the practice of fitting up masts according to the length of the ship. On these masts there is a good spread of canvas to assist in propelling the ship. The City of Rome is rigged with four masts; and here the handsome full-ship rig of the Inman line has been adhered to, with the addition of the fore and aft rigged jigger mast, rendered necessary by the enormous length of the vessel. It will be seen that the distinctive type of the Inman line has not been departed from in respect to the old fashioned but still handsome profile, with clipper bow, figurehea

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