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Through the Magic Door

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Published: 1909
Language: English
Wordcount: 47,015 / 136 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 76.2
LoC Category: PN
Downloads: 20,087
mnybks.net#: 2312
Genre: Essays

Essays on books.

Show Excerpt

rnold upon the glorious "Lays," where he calls out "is this poetry?" after quoting--

"And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds For the ashes of his fathers And the Temples of his Gods?"

In trying to show that Macaulay had not the poetic sense he was really showing that he himself had not the dramatic sense. The baldness of the idea and of the language had evidently offended him. But this is exactly where the true merit lies. Macaulay is giving the rough, blunt words with which a simple-minded soldier appeals to two comrades to help him in a deed of valour. Any high-flown sentiment would have been absolutely out of character. The lines are, I think, taken with their context, admirable ballad poetry, and have just the dramatic quality and sense which a ballad poet must have. That opinion of Arnold's shook my faith in his judgment, and yet I would forgive a good deal to the man who wrote--

"One more charge and then be dumb, When the forts of Folly fall, May the victors when they c

Reader Reviews

Average Rating of 4 from 1 reviews: ****
2016.06.21
Greg B.
****.

In This little book, Doyle describes his favorite bookshelf and the books it contains. He gives his review and feelings about the books he has that mean the most to him. And when he enters his library and closes the door, he leaves the real world and enters a magical place where the world stops and anything is possible...on the library side of the door.


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Simon Clark
Simon Clark lives in Doncaster, South Yorkshire and his stories have been published in Darklands 2, Dark Voices 5 and The Year's Best Horror Stories. His work has been broadcast on BBC Radio 4 and he has also written some prose for U2. In his latest horror novel, Vampyrrhic, Clark brought horrific viking warriors from long ago to the shores of England in the form of undead vampires. As our Author of the Day, he tells us all about it.
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