The Roman Pronunciation of Latin

Why we use it and how to use it

Author: Frances E. Lord
Published: 1894
Language: English
Wordcount: 18,407 / 67 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 47.3
LoC Category: PA
Downloads: 732
Added to site: 2010.07.08
mnybks.net#: 28401
Origin: gutenberg.org
Genre: Language
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Excerpt

alem ponitur. Nam consonans non potest esse, quia ante se habet alteram consonantem, id est +q+; vocalis esse non potest, quia sequitur illam vocalis, ut quare, quomodo.

DIPHTHONGS.

In Marius Victorinus we find diphthongs thus defined:

[Mar. Vict. Gaisford, I. v. 54.] Duae inter se vocales jugatae ac sub unius vocis enuntiatione prolatae syllabam faciunt natura longam, quam Graeci diphthongon vocant, veluti geminae vocis unum sonum, ut +ae+, +oe+, +au+.

And more fully in the following paragraph:

[Mar. Vict. Gaisford, I. v. 6.] Sunt longae naturaliter syllabae, cum duae vocales junguntur, quas syllabas Graeci diphthongos vocant; ut +ae+, +oe+, +au+, +eu+, +ei+: nam illae diphthongi non sunt quae fiunt per vocales loco consonantium positas; ut +ia+, +ie+, +ii+, +io+, +iu+, +va+, +ve+, +vi+, +vo+, +vu+.

Of these diphthongs +eu+ occurs,--except in Greek words,--only in heus, heu, eheu; in seu, ceu

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