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Seeing France with Uncle John

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Author: Anne Warner
Published: 1906
Language: English
Wordcount: 36,561 / 102 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 85.3
LoC Category: PZ
Downloads: 434
Added to site: 2011.08.17 30611

re poor, you get it as soon as you get outside of your bed clothes. Rather a medieval staircase, eh? And four orange-trees at the bottom to try and fool us into feeling balmy. However, I don't mind little discomforts: all I mind is being shut up on a ship with a darned fool like that man Sibbilly. I shouldn't wonder if his mother was his wife, after all. I could believe anything of him. I didn't like him.

"We'll go to take in the cathedral first; it isn't far, and I've got it all by heart. Thirteenth century and unsymmetrical--you must remember that. There, that's it ahead there--with the scaffolding. They're bolstering it up somewhat, so as to keep on hooking tourists, I presume. The biggest tower is the Butter Tower, built out of paid-for permissions to eat butter in Lent. Rather a rough joke, its being so much the biggest, isn't it? The whole cathedral's lopsided from eating butter, so to speak. I believe it's the thing to stop in front and act as if you were overcome; so we'll just call a halt here

Reader Reviews

Average Rating of 3 from 1 reviews: ***
Leah A. Zeldes

In this epistolary novel-cum-travelogue, a young American writes home while touring France with her impatient and eccentric uncle. Uncle John takes his duties as chaperone very seriously, as they encounter other Americans again and again. It's lightly amusing, but there's not much to it.



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