The Treaty With China, its Provisions Explained

The Treaty With China, its Provisions Explained
New York Tribune, Tuesday, August 28, 1868

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The Treaty With China, its Provisions Explained by Mark Twain

Published:

1868

Pages:

30

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1,030

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The Treaty With China, its Provisions Explained
New York Tribune, Tuesday, August 28, 1868

By

0
(0 Reviews)

Book Excerpt

d--mind you, sold, for cash, to these assemblages--20,000 copies of religious books, thus wisely and pleasantly combining salvation with business. If a Chinese missionary were to come disseminating his eternal truths among us, we would laugh at him first and bombard him with cabbages afterward. We would do this because we are civilized and enlightened. We would make him understand that he couldn't peddle his eternal truths in this market. China is one of the few countries where perfect religious freedom prevails. It is one of the few countries where no disabilities are inflicted on a man for his religion's sake, in the matter of holding office and embezzling the public funds. A Jesuit priest was formerly the Vice-President of the Board of Public Works, an exceedingly high position, and the present Viceroy of two important provinces is a Mohammedan. There are a great many Mohammedans in China. The last clause of article 4 was not absolutely necessary, perhaps. Still, it was well enough to have it in. When the

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