Scientific American Supplement, No. 643

Scientific American Supplement, No. 643
April 28, 1888

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Scientific American Supplement, No. 643
April 28, 1888

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Book Excerpt

ence of torulæ impossible, and you exclude with certainty fermentative action.

In precisely the same way, provide a proteinaceous solution, capable of the highest putrescence, but absolutely sterilized, and placed in an optically pure or absolutely calcined air; and while these conditions are maintained, no matter what length of time may be suffered to elapse, the putrescible fluid will remain absolutely without trace of decay.

But suffer the slightest infection of the protected and pure air to take place, or, from some putrescent source, inoculate your sterilized fluid with the minutest atom, and shortly turbidity, offensive scent, and destructive putrescence ensue.

As in the alcoholic, lactic, or butyric ferments, the process set up is shown to be dependent upon and concurrent with the vegetative processes of the demonstrated organisms characterizing these ferments; so it can be shown with equal clearness and certainty that the entire process of what is known as putrescence is equally and as absolu

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Carol Gosa-Summerville - Writing About the Joys and Challenges of the Christian Walk
FEATURED AUTHOR - As a public school teacher for many years, Carol challenged her students to explore all genres of books and discover the power of the written word. As a retired teacher, she's living her dream of creating characters, locations and conflicts through her own writing. As our Author of they Day, Carol talks about God's Sacred Feast, the second novel in her series, "Chronicles of the Hamlet of Sipsey." Please give us a short introduction to what God's Sacred Feast is about. God’s Sacred Feast is… Read more