Mr. Punch's Country Life

Mr. Punch's Country Life
The Punch Library of Humour
3
(2 Reviews)
Mr. Punch's Country Life by Unknown

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83

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Mr. Punch's Country Life
The Punch Library of Humour
3
(2 Reviews)

Book Excerpt

TINGS

(Culled by Dumb-Crambo Junior)

Marshal Niel--Rose.

Row-doe-den'd-run.

Minion-ate.

Pick-o'-tea.

Car-nation.

Dahli-a.

Any-money.

Double Pink.

Few-shiers.

Glad I-o-la!]

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A CONUNDRUM TO FILL UP A GAP IN THE CONVERSATION.--Why is a person older than yourself like food for cattle?

Because he's past your age (pasturage).

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EVERYTHING COMES TO THE MAN WHO WAITS.--Country Rector's Wife (engaging man-servant). And can you wait at dinner?

Man. Aw, yes, mum; I'm never that hoongry but I can wait till you've done.

* * * * *

[Illustration: A QUESTION OF VESTED INTEREST

Vicar. "Well, gentlemen, what can I do for you?"

Spokesman. "Please, sir, we be a deputation from farmers down Froglands parish, to ask you to pray for fine weather for t'arvest."

Vicar. "Why don't you ask your own Vicar?"

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Humor (Rustic) / Satire


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Plot bullets

This is not so much of a story of Mr. Punch's life in the country.
The country life is just a stage for a series of short skits and one-liners about country life.
It appears to be much in the tradition of the Punch Magazine.

If you've read some Dorothy L. Sayers or Margery Allingham mysteries set in the English countryside, or Ngaio Marsh's English country life mysteries, you will be reminded of some of the scenes with locals. Some of it went over my head, but a lot of it was humorous, mostly in a gentle tweaking way.

On or about page 55, there is a short "Wessex novel" which is a satire on Thomas Hardy's work. If you recall any of them from school, you will enjoy this more. When you find out the main character's name--very funny. And it spoofs Hardy's LONG descriptions as in a scene where the young heroine looks out over the land and sees "a procession making their way over the parched fields (two pages of field description omitted--Editor).'