Salomy Jane

Salomy Jane

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(1 Review)
Salomy Jane by Bret Harte

Published:

1898

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1,244

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Salomy Jane

By

1
(1 Review)
The handsome daughter of Madison. She kisses John Dart, a young horse-thief, in the hands of the Vigilants, because he has no friends to bid him good-by. He escapes and haunts the neighborhood to get a glimpse of her...

Book Excerpt

kiss on his daughter's hair, and, taking his shotgun from the corner, departed on a peaceful Samaritan mission to a cow who had dropped a calf in the far pasture. Inclined as he was to Reuben's wooing from his eligibility as to property, he was conscious that he was sadly deficient in certain qualities inherent in the Clay family. It certainly would be a kind of _mésalliance_.

Left to herself, Salomy Jane stared a long while at the coffee-pot, and then called the two squaws who assisted her in her household duties, to clear away the things while she went up to her own room to make her bed. Here she was confronted with a possible prospect of that proverbial bed she might be making in her willfulness, and on which she must lie, in the photograph of a somewhat serious young man of refined features--Reuben Waters--stuck in her window-frame. Salomy Jane smiled over her last witticism regarding him and enjoyed it, like your true humorist, and then, catching sight of her own handsome face in the little mirror, s

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Fortunately this story is not long because it is absolutely terrible. Bad enough that the main characters speak in 'cowboy dialect' but even this is not consistent. Salomy sometimes speaks perfect English and other times she talks 'cowboy.' Her father, Madison, will sometimes drop his 'g's' and sometimes he won't often in the same sentence. And the story itself is rather lame, certainly not enough to make up for the terrible dialects. Read at your own risk!
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