Who Can Be Happy and Free in Russia?

Who Can Be Happy and Free in Russia?

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Who Can Be Happy and Free in Russia?  by Nicholas Nekrassov

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1879

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Who Can Be Happy and Free in Russia?

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English translation by Juliet M. Soskice in 1917, with an Introduction by Dr. David Soskice.

Book Excerpt

e Tsar's fears aroused by the events of the French Revolution of 1848.

Byelinsky died in that year from consumption in the very presence of the gendarmes who had come to arrest him for some literary offence. Dostoyevsky was seized, condemned to death, and when already on the scaffold, with the rope around his neck, reprieved and sent for life to the Siberian mines. The rigours still increased during the Crimean War, and it was only after the death of Nicholas I., the termination of the war, and the accession of the liberal Tsar, Alexander II., that Nekrassov and Russian literature in general began to breathe more freely. The decade which followed upon 1855 was one of the bright periods of Russian history. Serfdom was abolished and many great reforms were passed. It was then that Nekrassov's activity was at its height. His review Sovremenik was a stupendous success, and brought him great fame and wealth. During that year some of his finest poems appeared in it: "The Peasant Children," "Orina, the

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