Arms and the Man

Arms and the Man
A Pleasant Play

By

4.5
(4 Reviews)
Arms and the Man by George Bernard Shaw

Published:

1898

Pages:

88

Downloads:

16,567

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Arms and the Man
A Pleasant Play

By

4.5
(4 Reviews)

Book Excerpt

obviously disregards all the canons and unities and other things which every well-bred dramatist is bound to respect that his work is really unworthy of serious criticism (orthodox). Indeed he knows no more about the dramatic art than, according to his own story in "The Man of Destiny," Napoleon at Tavazzano knew of the Art of War. But both men were successes each in his way--the latter won victories and the former gained audiences, in the very teeth of the accepted theories of war and the theatre. Shaw does not know that it is unpardonable sin to have his characters make long speeches at one another, apparently thinking that this embargo applies only to long speeches which consist mainly of bombast and rhetoric. There never was an author who showed less predilection for a specific medium by which to accomplish his results. He recognized, early in his days, many things awry in the world and he assumed the task of mundane reformation with a confident spirit. It seems such a small job at twenty to set the times

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Some 12th grade students might find the book boring but I find it rather interesting.
Shaw presents a society were the masters and the servants are clearly separated.We see that the servants are true to themsleves whie the matersare the ones who put up a facade thereby hiding their true nature.
All in all,I find it rather intriguing as I get the inside scoop of what actually happens in the homes and lives of those who control our society.
It is one of the best plays I have ever read. It has all the elements that make a play interesting. The play does an excellent job at ridiculing the outdated notion of chivalry.
J.D. Moyer - Colliding Worlds and Repopulation of a Wild Earth
FEATURED AUTHOR - J.D. Moyer lives in Oakland, California, with his wife, daughter, and mystery-breed dog. He writes science fiction, produces electronic music in two groups (Jondi & Spesh and Momu), runs a record label (Loöq Records), and blogs at jdmoyer.com. His previous occupations include dolphin cognition researcher, martial arts instructor, Renaissance Faire actor, dance music event promoter, and DJ. His short stories have appeared in several magazines and his novelette The Icelandic Cure won the 2016… Read more