The Time Machine

The Time Machine

By

4.4
(10 Reviews)
The Time Machine by H. G. Wells

Published:

1895

Pages:

78

ISBN:

0451528557

Downloads:

83,958

Share This

The Time Machine

By

4.4
(10 Reviews)
A brilliant fantasy beyond conventional thought...

Book Excerpt

thought of it. It's plain enough, and helps the paradox delightfully. We cannot see it, nor can we appreciate this machine, any more than we can the spoke of a wheel spinning, or a bullet flying through the air. If it is travelling through time fifty times or a hundred times faster than we are, if it gets through a minute while we get through a second, the impression it creates will of course be only one-fiftieth or one-hundredth of what it would make if it were not travelling in time. That's plain enough.' He passed his hand through the space in which the machine had been. `You see?' he said, laughing.

We sat and stared at the vacant table for a minute or so. Then the Time Traveller asked us what we thought of it all.

`It sounds plausible enough to-night,' said the Medical Man; 'but wait until to-morrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning.'

`Would you like to see the Time Machine itself?' asked the Time Traveller. And therewith, taking the lamp in his hand, he led the way down

Readers reviews

5
4
3
2
1
4.4
Average from 10 Reviews
4.4
Write Review
Its accessibility might disguise the astounding level of insight and intelligence within the pages. It may seem like an adventure with a relatively shallow, cursory commentary on social conditions, but a bit of contemplation will reveal some staggering predictions (and warnings!) from Wells.

Take from this story whatever you like (it is simply fun on the surface!). However, if you find yourself dismissing its message as a simple warning against the stratification of society, then I recommend you think a little harder about what it is truly trying to tell you. Perhaps what you thought were metaphors weren't quite as abstract as you thought; and those aspects you dismissed as plot mechanics mean a bit more.
The powerful descriptions alone, especially towards the end, are staggering. Its almost hard to find words for it.
A fantastic book! Relatively easy to read (saying a lot for some 19th century literature) and the sheer imagination involved given the time is, at times, breathtaking.
this book is a great book and even tough they never give an exact name "the time traveler"is the best caracter even though he dissapprers in the end
A great book and while a bit slow at time is still a fascinating read. If you enjoy this book there is a must read that is a sequel to The Time Machine. Written in 1995 by Stephen Baxter, "The Time Ships" picks up the story within minutes of where Jules Verne left this one. Mr Baxter even uses some of the olde-english writing style.
I read it many years ago for the first time and a couple times since. While I might agree it may require some amount of patience before it manages to engage the reader -- what with the Olde English prose and all -- I think it's well worth the effort. I found Well's vivid description of the underground world, its inhabitants (the Morlocks), and how they came to be chilling. In sum, it was very horrific and thought-provoking story that's right up there with Shelley's Frankenstein.
Profile picture for user bokemom
summertime
3
The book is okay, it's kinda boring, but it gets better. Anyways, I hope you enjoy it! :D